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The Shape We’re In: Early Maps of Florida

Now on Exhibit – July 4, 2021

Every school kid knows that Ponce de Leon was the first European explorer to “discover” Florida. But, was he?

A new exhibition of rare, early maps in the History Center, Touchton Map Library suggests otherwise.

“The Shape We’re In: Early Maps of Florida” opens Saturday, Sept. 19, and includes one of the rarest Florida maps in the world.

Printed in 1511, the Peter Martyr map as it’s commonly known, is the first to show the Florida peninsula, two years before Ponce de Leon landed on Florida’s east coast.

 

The map was a gift to the History Center in 2019 by Art and Jan Holzheimer of Chicago, longtime map collectors and admirers of the History Center.

The 1511 map is the centerpiece of an exhibit that includes some of the oldest printed maps of Florida, several of which date back to the early 1500s.

Incredibly rare, there are only 20 Martyr maps known to exist worldwide, with just a few in the U.S., and Tampa is now home to one of them.

“The Shape We’re In” is on exhibit in the Touchton Map Library’s Saunders Gallery.

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence 

Now on Exhibit

 The story of women’s suffrage is a story of voting rights, of inclusion in and exclusion from the franchise, and of our civic development as a nation. Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence, a poster exhibition from the Smithsonian, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment and explores the complexity of the women’s suffrage movement and the relevance of this history to Americans’ lives today.

The crusade for women’s suffrage is one of the longest reform movements in American history. Between 1832 and 1920, women citizens organized for the right to vote, agitating first in their states or territories and then, simultaneously, through petitioning for a federal amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Based on the National Portrait Gallery exhibition of the same name, Votes for Women seeks to expand visitors’ understanding of the suffrage movement in the United States. The poster exhibition addresses women’s political activism, explores the racism that challenged universal suffrage, and documents the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment which prohibits the government from denying U.S. citizens the right to vote on the basis of sex. It also touches upon the suffrage movement’s relevance to current conversations on voting and voting rights across America.

Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence is organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery. This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative.

The Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story is one of the country’s most ambitious undertakings to research, collect, document display and share the compelling story of women. It will deepen our understanding of women’s contributions to the nation and the world. More information about the initiative is available at womenshistory.si.edu.

Now on Exhibit – January 10, 2021

POP QUIZ:

What do Hulk Hogan, Chyna and
“Mr. Wonderful” Paul Orndorff have in common?

They all lived in Tampa.

Now on Exhibit – January 10, 2021

POP QUIZ:

What do Hulk Hogan, Chyna and
“Mr. Wonderful” Paul Orndorff have in common?

They all lived in Tampa.

Florida – especially the Tampa Bay area  ̶  has been home to a who’s who of larger-than-life pro wrestling personas – everyone from “The American Dream” Dusty Rhodes to “The Doctor of Thuganomics” John Cena.

Step into the squared circle and step back in time with Dusty, Hulk Hogan
and some of Florida’s best-known wrestling superstars during

“Sunshine State Showdown: Pro Wrestling in Tampa Bay,”

See the stories behind the legends along with one-of-a-kind artifacts from the archives of the WWE.

The exhibit features Tampa’s Rocky “Soul Man” Johnson’s robe and boots, the NWA Championship title belt, original posters, programs and tickets from bouts throughout the bay area and more.

Guests will learn about the origins of professional wrestling in America,
classic wrestling moves, wrestling jargon and trash talk.

“Florida has long been home to passionate wrestling fans and A-list wrestlers,”
said the History Center’s Curator of Public History, Dr. Brad Massey.
“The Tampa armory hosted professional and amateur wrestling and, later,
the bay area was a headquarters for some of wrestling’s biggest stars.
“Macho Man” Randy Savage, Hulk Hogan, John Cena – they all have bay area connections.”

The exhibit highlights the language of professional wrestling, exploring classic phrases and “trash talk,”
like Tampa resident John Cena’s “you can’t see me,” to industry jargon.
Terms like “heel” and “push” have a meaning all their own within the sport.

“Wrestling has a very specific language, and we had fun with the jargon and trash talk
that’s part of the sport’s unique nomenclature,” said Dr. Massey.

WWE, the WWE logo, all other WWE intellectual property and all WWE memorabilia are owned exclusively by WWE
and are used with permission 
or used under license.  All rights reserved.

*Talent subject to change.

Florida – especially the Tampa Bay area  ̶  has been home to a who’s who of larger-than-life pro wrestling personas – everyone from “The American Dream” Dusty Rhodes to “The Doctor of Thuganomics” John Cena.

Step into the squared circle and step back in time with Dusty, Hulk Hogan and some of Florida’s best-known wrestling superstars during

“Sunshine State Showdown: Pro Wrestling in Tampa Bay”

See the stories behind the legends along with one-of-a-kind artifacts from the archives of the WWE.

The exhibit features Tampa’s Rocky “Soul Man” Johnson’s robe and boots, the NWA Championship title belt, original posters, programs and tickets from bouts throughout the bay area and more.

Guests will learn about the origins of professional wrestling in America, classic wrestling moves, wrestling jargon and trash talk.

“Florida has long been home to passionate wrestling fans and A-list wrestlers,” said the History Center’s Curator of Public History, Dr. Brad Massey. “The Tampa armory hosted professional and amateur wrestling and, later, the bay area was a headquarters for some of wrestling’s biggest stars. “Macho Man” Randy Savage, Hulk Hogan, John Cena – they all have bay area connections.”

The exhibit highlights the language of professional wrestling, exploring classic phrases and “trash talk,” like Tampa resident John Cena’s “you can’t see me,” to industry jargon. Terms like “heel” and “push” have a meaning all their own within the sport.

“Wrestling has a very specific language, and we had fun with the jargon and trash talk that’s part of the sport’s unique nomenclature,” said Dr. Massey.

WWE, the WWE logo, all other WWE intellectual property and all WWE memorabilia are owned exclusively by WWE
and are used with permission 
or used under license.  All rights reserved.

WWE, the WWE logo, all other WWE intellectual property and all WWE memorabilia are owned exclusively by WWE and are used with permission or used under license.  All rights reserved.

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